8 May 2014

5-8-14 Tunisian lamp 2  Cr

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I love having guests here!  Every one of them brings something interesting and surprising to our lives.  This week we learned to make a Tuniesian lamp.
.5-8-14 Tunisian lamp 1  Cr
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Our sweet Tunesian guest was really chowing down on half an orange one night.   Then pouring olive oil into the rind.   Then taking a match to the orange’s spongy core.  It was too thick.  He thinned it a few times and finally got it going.  Once lit, a lamp like this will burn all night long.
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5-8-14 banana mousse R
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And his lovely German wife gave a cooking suggestion to Monica that has completely revolutionized desserts here.   She suggested smashing the frozen bananas and adding cocoa powder.   Monica took it two steps further.  She stuck the bananas in the food processor with the cocoa powder – creamy delicious.  And then she thought to add coconut milk to it.  Dear God in heaven!  It is like a perfect soft serve ice cream or a lovely mousse.  And no added sugar!  Unbelievable!
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5-8-14 moth brown Cr
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MORE MOTHS
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A friend from NC identified my “humpback” moth (24 April ’14) as a tobacco moth.   Well, well.   There is a tobacco factory about 3 kiometers down the road, but I’d never though of it in insect terms.   We’re seeing a lot of different moths right now, and Akka has a thing for them – is always having me go grab my camera.  This is a brown moth with orange gussets that always seems to be around.
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5-8-14 moth green  Cr
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But this little green beauty has just come to our attention.   I’m always happy for information if somebody can tell me more about either of them.
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5-8-14 beetle grubs in chicken pen R
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CHICKEN RUGBY
 
Austin found more rhinoceros beetle grubs. (They’ll keep you from starving, but won’t kick steak off the menu.)   This batch went straight to the chickens.   If you throw anything that looks like worms to chickens, they go crazy excited, but that didn’t happen with the grubs  – too fat, I’m guessing.   Instead the chicks circled around suspiciously for a long time.
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5-8-14 beetle grubs in chicken pen  Cr
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Finally Red here got curious.  He grabbed one grub and ran for a corner.  Others pursued.  Somebody else grabbed a grub – ran for another corner.   Chicks tussled over the “prizes” and then someone realized there were still more grubs in the tray.  After 15 minutes, there was no trace left.   They play for keeps.
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5-8-14 what an egg  R
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THIS IS RIDICULOUS
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I know I’ve shown you a goose egg already, but I saw this when I walked into the kitchen this week.  What the heck?!    It was a double goose egg.
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5-8-14 red earlobe hen
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AND NOW WE KNOW
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You can’t tell what color eggs a chicken is going to lay from its feathers.  All colors of chickens can lay white eggs or brown ones.  Most of the eggs we get are brown, but we get a few white ones.  Where are they coming from?    Not from the hen above.
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5-8-14 red earlobe rooster
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Not fathered by this rooster.
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5-8-14 white earlobe rooster
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Could be fathered by this rooster.
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5-8-14 white earlobe hen
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THIS is the one!  This is the white egg mother!    You can tell by the “earlobes” – the normally red fleshy part around where you’d expect ears.  See!
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And that’s my week.   Love to all y’all.
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12 thoughts on “8 May 2014

  1. That is a sphinx moth…the tobacco moth is one of hundreds (or perhaps thousands of species globally) but this one I think is only found in Fiji. I believe his species feeds on sweet potato leaves.

  2. Keep them coming Kim, I love your blog, such a breath of fresh air having been here for 16 years. I really appreciate hearing how the rest of the world lives. and you pack is always interesting. Love you sweetie, and love to the family. JO

  3. Lovely post! I like those candles and I’m envious of that giant egg! Our hens chase each other when one catches a mouse. It’s a bit dreadful. I have to take the mice away

    • You have mice catching hens? Is that a typo – or is it for real? If yes, we DEFINITELY need those chickens! Speckled eggs and pest control both! (If it was supposed to read “cats” – them chasing each other is not nearly as bad as the puked up mouse guts left behind all too often. UGH. I wish there were an easy, natural, non-toxic and humane way to be mouse-free here at the farm….).

  4. Oh my God! That’s wild! I have to ask Austin if our hens catch mice. He had a rat problem in the hen house and has tried different things to deal with it. If the hens helped catch them, I think he would have mentioned it.

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